Firm acts against cloning attack from Russian hackers

first_imgCybersecurity experts have praised a firm for its quick response when its website was partly cloned by hackers apparently based in Russia. East of England firm Ashtons Legal posted its own scam warning after elements of its website were copied and amalgamated into another website with a similar domain name for a firm referred to as ‘Ashton Partners LLP’. No such firm exists.The cloned website lists the names of five of the real Ashtons Legal fee earners and one support staff member. It gives contact details for an address in Leeds which is the base of another firm, Ashton Solicitors. Attempts have been made to send correspondence from someone purporting to be one of the named fee earners.Ashtons Legal said the domain name for Ashton Partners LLP appeared to have been registered in Russia two days before it came to the firm’s attention through one its fee earners. Efforts are being made to have it taken down, including instructing Russian lawyers.Meanwhile, Ashtons Legal has notified the Solicitors Regulation Authority and placed announcements on its social media pages to inform clients and other firms, as well as highlighting the matter in Google searches.Law firms are facing increasing threats from online scams and attempted frauds. The SRA issued 25 scam alerts in June alone, mostly involving scammers sending emails impersonating solicitors and their firms.Phil Edwards, managing director of legal indemnity insurance broker QPI Legal, who advises firms on how to protect themselves from cyber-attacks, said Ashtons Legal had responded well to the attempted cloning.’Firms are vulnerable when it comes to this type of cyber-attack and the reality is there is not a great deal they can do to protect themselves from it happening, however, what is crucial is that they act accordingly, responding rapidly and appropriately,’ he said.Edwards said this type of attack was not the most common cybersecurity breach; in his experience it has cropped up just once in the past five years.He said cyber-attacks are on the rise within the legal profession and firms need to remain vigilant, although he sounded a downbeat note about the chances of stopping incidents.’The biggest problem with these types of security breaches is that because it’s not a direct attack on the firm it could be some time before the firm finds out that it has actually happened,’ he added.’Very often the cloned site is domained outside of the UK. It can prove very difficult therefore for the the firm affected to get the site taken down, as has happened as well in this case.’last_img read more

High school football: Week 4 games

first_imgJames Davis went over 100yards rushing for the second straight week. Natchitoches (1-2) at Airline (2-1): This is a District 1-5A opener. Natchitoches Central moved into the district this season from District 2-5A. Plain Dealing is coming off a32-2 victory over Tensas and needs just one win to equal last year’s total.Senior quarterback Ken Gay has passed for 573 yards and eight touchdowns.Darrien Perry has caught 18 passes for 306 yards and four touchdowns.Perfect-Dating.comAre You Ready to Meet Cool Guys in Tung Chung?Perfect-Dating.com|SponsoredSponsoredUndoNews gadgetThis watch takes the whole country by storm! it’s price? Ridiculous!News gadget|SponsoredSponsoredUndoTheTopFiveVPNThe Trick Netflix Doesn’t Want You To Know To Unlock RestrictionsTheTopFiveVPN|SponsoredSponsoredUndoTheTopFiveVPNThe Secret Netflix Doesn’t Want You To Know To Unblock RestrictionsTheTopFiveVPN|SponsoredSponsoredUndoAspireAbove.comRemember Abby from NCIS? Take A Deep Breath Before You See How She Looks NowAspireAbove.com|SponsoredSponsoredUndoCelebsland.com9 Celebrity Before-And-After Plastic Surgery DisastersCelebsland.com|SponsoredSponsoredUndo The Panthers will be out toprove last week’s performance was a fluke. The Tigers will try to make their1-5A debut a memorable one in front of the home crowd. Decamerion Richardson rushedfor more than 200 yards for the third straight game with 205 on 16 carries. Hescored four TDs, including one on a pass reception. For the season, he’s rushedfor 621 yards. Parkway simply ran into theproverbial buzzsaw against undefeated Alexandria. The Panthers are much betteroffensively than they showed. The defense was on the field a long time. According to head coach JamesThurman, Plain Dealing is looking for only its second win over Haynesville inthe last 38 years. The Tors won 35-8 last season en route to a 10-0 regularseason. The Chiefs could easily beundefeated. They lost to North DeSoto 29-26 in their opener and Lake CharlesCollege Prep 50-49 last week. Their lone win was over Many 21-12. RodneyRobinson rushed for more than 100 yards in that game. North Caddo (2-1) at Bossier (3-0): The Bearkats will be looking to go 4-0 for the first time this decade. North Caddo has split one-point games the last two weeks, falling to Plain Dealing 29-28 in Week 2 and defeating St. Mary’s 14-13 last week. Byrd (0-3) at Haughton (3-0). The Bucs, who defeated Woodlawn 56-12 last week, are ranked No. 6 in the Louisiana Sports Writers Association Class 5A poll. Daniel Smith had nine catchesfor 174 yards and two touchdowns. Robert Summerlin/Special to The Press-Tribune … The Haughton Bucs defeated the Woodlawn Knights 56-12 last week. They host Byrd in a District 1-5A opener Friday night. Keeping the Jackets’ optionoffense from making long, time-consuming drives will be key. Byrd willobviously try to keep the Bucs’ explosive offense off the field. Benton is coming off a 57-30 victory over Huntington. The Tigers have yet to put together a complete game. They gave up multiple big plays in the first half against Huntington and trailed 30-27. But Benton dominated on both sides of the ball in the final two-and-a-half quarters, scoring 37 unaswered points. Charzay Morris leads the Rebels on the ground with 295 yards on 35 carries. An early lead will be a goodsign for Haughton. But this one could go down to the wire. Bossier is coming off a 48-40 victory over Logansport. The Bearkats had a 41-20 lead and then held off the Tigers in the final minute to preserve the victory. Turnovers and the inabilityto slow down Ruston’s ground game hurt the Vikings. Airline had trouble runningthe ball, but Alex Garcia passed for 263 yards and three TDs.  Parkway (2-1) at Benton (3-0): This is a District 1-5A opener and Benton’s first district game as member of the LHSAA’s highest classification. The Panthers and Tigers haven’t met since 2010 when both were in District 1-4A. Here is a quick look atFriday’s games involving Bossier Parish teams. All games kick off at 7 p.m. Byrd’s 0-3 record is misleading. The Yellow Jackets’ opponents have a combined record of 8-1. West Monroe, which lost to defending Texas Class 6A, Division II champion Longview 17-7 last week, is ranked No. 3 in Class 5A.  Calvary Baptist, which defeated Byrd 37-25 last week, is No. 2 in Class 1A. Plain Dealing (2-1) at Haynesville (0-3): This is a District 1-1A opener. Perennial Class 1A power Haynesville is off to an uncharacteristically rough start. The Tors have won 12 straight district titles and 41 since 1970, according to 14-0 Productions. Haughton has won the last two meetings, 44-19 in 2017 and 42-21 last year.  The 2017 victory was the Bucs’ first over the Jackets since moving up to District 1-5A in 2011. After losing to North Webster in Week 1, Haynesville has lost to Minden 35-7 and Junction City, Ark., 41-0. Airline played Ruston to a21-21 draw at the half last week, but the Bearcats pulled away in the secondfor a 49-28 victory.last_img read more

Cameron Artis-Payne: I’d rush for 2,000 yards in Big Ten

first_img Session ID: 2020-09-17:8296d4b7ed1b03a5a9598f96 Player ID: videojs-brightcove-player-31641-3965851047001 OK Close Modal DialogCaption Settings DialogBeginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsDefaultsDoneClose Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Arriving as the nation’s top JUCO running back, Artis-Payne had to wait behind Tre Mason before taking over as the lead back for the Tigers. Once he did, the Harrisburg, Pennsylvania native made sure there wasn’t a drop off in production.“CAP’s played with a chip on his shoulder since he got here, including last year,” offensive coordinator Rhett Lashlee said. “I think that when he got his opportunity this year to be ‘the guy,’ he seized it. You’re always happy when your guys have success, but someone like CAP, who does everything right and who’s a great teammate, as a coach, it’s really fulfilling to see him have the success he’s had. He deserves everything he’s got.”After two years “on the couch” after high school, a year at a prep school, two seasons at Allan Hancock Community College in California and now two seasons at Auburn, Artis-Payne’s college career is coming to an end with the top head-to-head competition he could ask for.“I’m driven 24/7 so just having another great back across from me that’s supposed to be the best, I mean it’s icing on the cake,” he said. “It’s the way I’d like to go out.”Wisconsin running back Melvin Gordon runs with the ball during the first half of the Big Ten Conference championship NCAA college football game against Ohio State Saturday, Dec. 6, 2014, in IndianapolisWisconsin running back Melvin Gordon runs with the ball during the first half of the Big Ten Conference championship NCAA college football game against Ohio State Saturday, Dec. 6, 2014, in IndianapolisAuburn safeties coach and interim defensive coordinator Charlie Harbison felt Gordon, who finished second in Heisman voting, was comparable to Georgia’s Nick Chubb and Todd Gurley. The Tigers defense is focused on playing downhill and staying gap sound to prevent open lanes.“He does some things where you think he may be tackled and he’s still trucking along,” defensive lineman Gabe Wright said. “That’s typically the sign of a great running back to me – guys that just refuse to be tackled by one or two guys – and I think that’s something that he possesses.”Asked if Artis-Payne’s remarks will add some fuel to Thursday’s game, Gordon, was confident in his abilities regardless of the competition.“I went for 140 on LSU so I mean you could call it what you want, I can’t help that I’m in the Big Ten conference,” Gordon said. “It is what it is. We’re going to compete. I feel like I could do what I do if I was in the SEC, PAC-(12), whatever conference I was in. I feel like it really wouldn’t make a difference. I could feel where he coming from though; he can’t help but to feel that way.”Wisconsin's Melvin Gordon (left) and Auburn's Cameron Arits-Payne during the Outback Bowl bowling competition on Sunday.Wisconsin’s Melvin Gordon (left) and Auburn’s Cameron Arits-Payne during the Outback Bowl bowling competition on Sunday. Session ID: 2020-09-17:ec33f0d95f1a2504c2d097d1 Player ID: videojs-brightcove-player-277667-3965851046001 OK Close Modal DialogCaption Settings DialogBeginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsDefaultsDoneClose Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. TAMPA – Melvin Gordon and Cameron Artis-Payne, two of the nation’s best running backs, will lead Wisconsin and Auburn to battle at high noon on Jan. 1 in the Outback Bowl.Before they’ll take the field at Raymond James stadium, the pair of headline writing workhorses began bowl week with a war of words.Artis-Payne, the SEC’s leading rusher (1,482 yards) has felt overlooked all year, especially compared to Gordon, Indiana’s Tevin Coleman and Nebraska’s Ameer Abdullah. All three Big Ten back were finalists for the Doak Walker Award as the nation’s top running back, which Artis-Payne was a semifinalist for and Gordon won.“I mean to be the No. 1 rusher in the SEC I didn’t get too much respect but I mean hey, that don’t really matter to me,” said Artis-Payne, who scored 11 rushing touchdowns. “I guess I just ain’t the biggest media attraction. I play football pretty well if you ask me, but we’ll see.”Following his 129-yard outing against Samford, Artis-Payne said he would’ve liked to play against Illinois, Northwestern and Rutgers, as Gordon did and was able to pad his stats against the Big Ten’s worst teams.Artis-Payne stood by his comments this week, throwing another of the Midwest’s cellar dwellers in for good measure in a game week salvo, and believes he would’ve topped 2,000 yards in the Big Ten just like Gordon, the nation’s leading rusher (2,336 yards), and Coleman (2,036) did.“I still would’ve (liked to play) Illinois, Northwestern, Purdue, I mean it would’ve been great,” Artis-Payne said. “We’re not playing against that type of team. We’re playing against a great Big Ten opponent. Wisconsin is solid the whole way around They got a great offense, they got a great defense and it’s going to be a battle once we get out there.”So is Artis-Payne saying the competition for Gordon was easy? Even the Badgers tailback wanted to know.“I’m not going to say that. I’m not going to say that,” Artis-Payne said with a grin. “I’m going to just say I would’ve loved to play against Northwestern, Illinois and Purdue.”Artis-Payne’s SEC-best 221 yards came against Texas A&M’s pitiful rush defense, and he did struggle with the better run defenses of Kansas State (63), Alabama (77) and Mississippi State (70).Gordon had 175 yards against Illinois, 259 against Northwestern and 128 against Rutgers, and posted 140 yards against LSU compared to Artis-Payne’s 124. The Badgers running back is coming off a just 76-yard performance against Ohio State.Gordon wasn’t even familiar with Artis-Payne when asked about him by name this week.“Who?” Gordon responded.It wasn’t a shot at Auburn’s running back, merely a lack of knowledge of all the SEC’s players as Gordon went on to explain.“I didn’t follow too much with the SEC,” Gordon said. “I kind of follow some of the players and I kind of just focused on the teams that we were playing. … I don’t watch the offense of Auburn so I wouldn’t really know how good he is. If he’s leading the SEC you’ve got to be pretty good. … Looked pretty explosive.“We’re definitely going to compete out there. It would be crazy to say we aren’t. You want to be the best back on the field, so me and him are definitely going to compete.”Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 0:00Loaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%0:00 Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1ChaptersChaptersdescriptions off, selectedDescriptionssubtitles off, selectedSubtitlescaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedCaptionsAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window. The Video Cloud video was not found. Error Code: VIDEO_CLOUD_ERR_VIDEO_NOT_FOUND Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 0:00Loaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%0:00 Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1ChaptersChaptersdescriptions off, selectedDescriptionssubtitles off, selectedSubtitlescaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedCaptionsAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window. The Video Cloud video was not found. Error Code: VIDEO_CLOUD_ERR_VIDEO_NOT_FOUNDlast_img read more

Strengthening Midwifery in Mexico and Meeting Women Where They Are

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on October 21, 2015October 13, 2016By: Sarah Blake, MHTF consultantClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The panel discussion on Mexico’s ongoing efforts to strengthen midwifery began with an introduction from Paloma Bonfil of the Interdisciplinary Group on Women, Work and Poverty. She characterized the task of members of the National Safe Motherhood Committee’s as both a practical effort and one aimed at reorienting health services overall. While the focus of the initiative is on core steps to building a cadre of professional midwives: organizing education, deploying new professionals appropriately, and organizing health policies to support this, presenters stressed throughout that professional midwives, while fundamental to the strategy, are not the most important population affected by the initiative: women are.In describing the challenge that Mexico now faces, Bonfil noted that while in Mexico, there is a “strong midwifery tradition, but it has always been outside of the formal health system,” and it is now concentrated among rural, indigenous community. However, she pointed out that the need for professional midwives is not limited to these settings. While most women deliver in health facilities, shortages of skilled providers at primary and secondary health facilities mean that quality of care is often in question, while the obstetric and neonatal nurses who are now trained to deliver many of the core functions of midwifery are not effectively deployed – and are, often frustrated as a result.The presentations that followed highlighted key details of the effort to, as presenter Sharon Bissell of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation described it, “make midwives a ‘legitimate’ option” for women so important. Bissell pointed out that among the challenges for strengthening midwifery were the multiple discourses and perspectives that surround the idea of midwifery, noting that many do not see midwifery as a profession. She described the task of the shared effort as working toward “a tipping point” in public understanding of midwives’ roles, supportive policies, investments in midwifery training and deployment, and strong leadership guiding the way forward. With such a point, it would be possible to create a “defined path” toward expanding the midwifery workforce in order to address quality, access and use of services, and ultimately accelerating progress on improving health outcomes.This point was further expanded by Hilda Reyes of the Centro Nacional de Equidad de Genero y Salud Reproductiva (National Center for Gender Equity and Reproductive Health) of Mexico’s Secretariat of Health, who began her presentation on the full model, pointing out that while Mexico has made major advances in maternal health outcomes over the past 40 years, MDG5 was not met, and, further, 90% of women who die from maternal causes have antenatal care in a health care institution, underscoring gaps in both quality and access to comprehensive care. Reyes and Raffaela Schiavon Ermani of Ipas  both highlighted key components of the effort to build and deploy a midwifery workforce. Reyes focused on issues such as the pragmatic challenges for establishing the new institutions and models of training that will enable a new cohort of midwives with the clinical and cultural competencies to deliver care, given that there are fewer than 100 midwives in the country. Schiavon expanded on this in her presentation, highlighting the ways that the evidence gathered and presented in the State of the World’s Midwives 2014 helps to inform discussions refining policies to support a new model of health service delivery across the continuum, noting that evidence from the SoWMy helps to describe both the scope of the problem and, looking beyond Mexico, presents some potential models for addressing these challenges. She pointed out that Mexico is far from alone in having few providers equipped with all of the core midwifery competencies, while emphasizing that building technical skills, including family planning and safe abortion, along with care during labor and delivery and for both women and newborns after a birth. In describing the key pieces of evidence from the SoWMy that have informed consultations, she pointed out that key points have always been that midwifery, while cost-effective, is not simply a substitute for more expensive care, but rather, part of a model in which skilled birth attendance is not synonymous with institutional delivery – not because, as is currently the case, institutional delivery does not always ensure quality care, but because the health system is responsive to women’s needs and preferences.Finally, Javier Dominguez of UNFPA described key elements of the planning midwifery workforce expansion at state level and for local decision-making. He pointed to the four elements of the definition of the right to health that shape assessment of the strategy: accessibility of services, availability of workers, and quality care – which includes culturally acceptable care. In his presentation, he made clear that these elements are irreducible: if the initiative is to “transform the hegemonic system,” it is not enough to simply train midwives, but to make sure they are deployed appropriately to reach women in remote communities, and that they deliver care that is both clinically and culturally competent. He further emphasized this point in response to a question on the treatment of traditional midwives under the initiative: “We must be absolutely inclusive. Without this, this initiative will not work.” That is, to fulfill the vision of the initiative, there will be opportunities for any provider, involved in caring for women and babies to play a constructive role – including traditional midwives – who, the panelists noted, may accompany professional midwives or in other roles in community-level care and coordination.Photo: ©2012 PWRDF, used under a Creative Commons Attribution license.Share this:last_img read more